Parasystole, Standing Waves

Known as ponderingman on YouTube, this Kryptos new-comer suggests that the raised letters YA and R are markers referring to the plaintext characters in those same positions.

Those letters would be WL and D from the following:

SLOWLYDESPARATLYSLOWLY

Furthermore, he suggests a reason for the misspelling of DESPERATELY.  By removing the W, L, and D (raised letters) from the plaintext, we get a possible new keyword, if somewhat out of order:

SLOYESPARAT…

…PARASYSTOLE

Jim’s talks about standing waves and layers gives this idea some credence.

The Kryptos Project

Gary Phillips, the author of the “Kryptos Revisited” web site monitors various Kryptos-Sculpture-related web sites, blogs, and news sources to give you the best in originality and usefulness.  One web site that has stood as a beacon of information in the vast sea of endless Kryptos references is “The Kryptos Project” by Jew-Lee Lann.

Please visit her web site for original Kryptos sources at www.theKryptosProject.com.

This professional source is now among the other “Kryptos Revisited” recommended sites:

Material in Final Review

The kryptos.info research group will be releasing new information on a regular basis through Kryptos Revisited and related external web sites.  The group consists of Kryptos professionals and experienced enthusiasts who have volunteered their time and resources to compiling information related to Jim Sanborn’s CIA Sculpture, Kryptos.  New theories and possible insights to the sculpture will be reported along with interactive tools for public use.

Although the group is closed to invitation, you may direction questions to fb@kryp-tos.in-fo (remove dashes).

Kryptos Employs a Fibonacci Sequence?

Does that CIA Sculpture, Kryptos, employ a Fibonacci Cipher?  Vorlath, a.k.a. “Krazy Kryptos,” has been spinning his Kryptos wheels for some time now.  He proposes at his blog that the misspellings in Kryptos are a clue to be used in conjunction with the misaligned letters of K3.  The position of those misspellings form a Fibonacci Sequence as observed by other sleuths years ago.

What Vorlath suggests is that endYAhR (capital letters depicted here are actually raised letters in the sculpture) is a reversed Fibonacci sequence.  Matter-of-factly, he is correct, and I think the correlation between this and the misspellings is noteworthy if nothing more than one of the hundred thousand insignificant coincidences we could fine in the sculpture.  However, there are other anomalies that suggest “a reverse” of something.  We have the backward ciphertext or tableau.  We have “Antipodes (look up the meaning),” the CIA sculpture’s sister sculpture at the Hirshhorn Museum, and we’re aware of other oddities that may tie a Reverse Fibonacci Sequence into Kryptos.

When Sanborn asked, “Has anyone figured out what those are?  They’re important,” he implied that the misaligned letters could be interpreted with some finality (not to imply certainty) that leads us into the entire algorithm that unlocks the cipher known the world over as K4.  Is, “Yes, Mr. Sanborn, we know what those are.  Now what?” get us any closer to the answers?  I certainly think it’s worth the effort to pursue at this point in time.

Go check out Krazy Kryptos’ recent article: “K3 DYAHR Curiosity

and then peruse the rest of his blog to see the untamed inner-workings of a person who loves puzzles.

Certain to be Worth Your Time

The kryptos.info network is comprised of facts, promising conjecture, and inspirational entertainment as it relates to Jim Sanborn’s CIA Sculpture, Kryptos.  Although kryptos.info, kryptosrevisited.com, and realmoftwelve.net are not a part of a formal partnership with other contributing web sites and discussion forums, the concept of the kryptos.info network includes the latest favorable ideas from outside sources.  Here are a few new ones:

ninetysevenletters.wordpress.com (blog)

kryptoswiki.com (now live!)

apexofkryptos.wordpress.com (blog)

The “APEX” of Kryptos (theory/orientation to logical matrix manipulation)

Disinformation or Lazy Maintenance?

Many rumours about Kryptos flood the Internet.  It is difficult to distinguish between fact and fiction when it comes to the sculpture, especially to those who have only recently been exposed to it.  A new document entitled “Misconceptions” at KryptosRevisited.com will attempt to track some of the more widespread claims about Kryptos and distinguish truth from deception through articles and sources directly produced from James Sanborn’s own words.  Much of the disinformation about the sculpture — or Misinformation — is not a product of intentional misdirection, rather it is often attributed to earlier perceptions of Kryptos that has since become outdated or reformed in light of more precise focus over time.

For example, Kryptos Part Three (k3), is commonly understood to be encoded by a Triple or Keyed Columnar Transposition.  A decade ago, that was anyone’s best guess, and it seemed elegant at the time.  Since then, a much simpler, artistic cipher called a Double Rotation Transposition has been demonstrated to also be the solution to that part of the code, and it makes the old technique seem overly-complicated and confusing.  This is one such example of new information that is difficult to discover online because of the overwhelming number of references to outdated material.

One way to stay abreast of new information is to subscribe to the kryptos.info network blog RSS feed (comments can also be subscribed on an individual-article basis through the web site) and to bookmark KryptosRevisited.com as your up-to-date source for Kryptos Sculpture information.  We know you’re busy cracking the code, so we’ll make sure you’re informed with the latest breaking news and discoveries.

Gary Phillips writes about Kryptos, the sculpture at CIA Headquarters in Langley, Virginia, at his web site KryptosRevisited.com.

Kryptos Sculpture Discussion Forums

Another discussion feature has been added to the kryptos.info network.  Gary Phillips maintains a list of Kryptos-related discussion forums from around the web, and links to relevant articles are automatically generated on pages throughout the site.  Powered by Google, certain key words appearing in various articles are compared against a database of blogs and discussion groups, so if you’re hosting a forum that is related to Jim Sanborn’s CIA Sculpture “Kryptos,” post a link here, and it will get added to the growing list.

Gary Phillips writes about Kryptos at his web site Kryptos Revisited.

kryptosRevisited.com Introduction

Welcome to the kryptos.info network!  (click here to see the web site connected to this blog)

Kryptos Revisited” is a web site that explores Kryptos, a sculpture by James Sanborn located at CIA HQ in Langley, VA.  The Kryptos Sculpture contains several encrypted messages, and much of the focus has been on three of four passages encoded on its prominent copper scroll.  The quest has been to unlock the final passages of the encoding and to unveil the remaining mysteries yet shadowed in the veil of uncertainty.

I personally welcome you to this group and ask that you introduce yourself to the growing number of kryptos.info participants.  Your name, a brief background, and general purpose for your visit will suffice.  Individuals and groups are welcome to participate in the discussions that span this web site, and we all ask that any information used herein leading to a breakthrough or solution be credited back to this web site and this group.  This implies that any press release will credit kryptos.info or kryptosRevisited.com as a resource instrumental to any new information.  By all means take personal credit, and acknowledge the rest of us, as we in turn will do so for you.

Without further adieu, here’s to a successful and worthy journey as we explore Kryptos.

looking forward to meeting you,

gary

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